Fauci says vaccinations will assist coronavirus variants from rising

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Fauci says vaccinations will help coronavirus variants from emerging

COVID-19 vaccinations will not only help stop the virus from spreading, they will also hamper the coronavirus’ ability to mutate into new variants, Dr. Anthony Fauci said on Thursday.”Viruses don’t mutate unless they replicate,” Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said at a news briefing at the White House, his first under the administration of President Joe Biden.”And if you can suppress that by a very good vaccine campaign, then you could actually avoid this deleterious effect that you might get from the mutations,” Fauci said.Fauci’s remarks come as scientists around the world attempt to decipher what the new variants may mean for those who’ve been vaccinated or have antibodies to the virus.While a few recent studies suggest that a variant first detected in South Africa may be a problem, even for people who have been vaccinated, at least one recent study found evidence that people vaccinated against coronavirus will be protected against new variants.The South African variant has not yet been detected in the United States. Other variants include one first identified in the United Kingdom and one found in Brazil.Related video — Fauci: ‘Liberating’ to work with new team on virus’A constant pattern of basically running out’ of vaccineFor a second time, more than a million vaccine shots were given in a single day, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced on Thursday.More than 17.5 million vaccine doses had been administered in the U.S., and almost 2.4 million Americans have been fully vaccinated, according to the CDC.And the push to get people vaccinated has grown even as officials work to meet demand with limited supply.”Demand for the vaccine will be much greater than the supply for some time,” Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds said in a Thursday news conference.She said her state is 46th nationally in the amount of doses allocated, with just 19,500 doses each week, though the state is ranked 15th for administering the vaccine. She’s not sure why the state is receiving few doses but hopes that Iowa will be allocated more doses in the coming weeks, perhaps by the first week of February. “We are doing a lot with relatively little vaccine,” Reynolds said.New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said the state is administering about 65,000 doses a day — a rate that will deplete its current supply in two or three days. “What’s clear now is that we will be going from week to week and you will see a constant pattern of basically running out, waiting for the next week’s allocation and then starting up again,” Cuomo said.The state will receive 250,400 doses next week, but Cuomo urged President Biden to increase the supply to states immediately.”At this current rate of supply, it takes seven and a half months to get enough vaccine for the currently eligible population,” Cuomo said.Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers issued a statewide mask mandate on Tuesday while the state waited for more vaccine doses.”At the end of the day, vaccine supplies are limited, so while we continue to ask the federal government for more vaccines and faster, we have to keep working together to stop the spread today,” Evers said, “by continuing to wear our masks, staying home whenever we can, avoiding gatherings, and doubling down on our efforts to keep our friends, neighbors and families safe.”Biden: US Death toll likely to top half a million in FebruaryThe COVID-19 death toll in the U.S. will likely top 500,000 next month, President Biden said in a news conference Thursday, as he portrayed his administration’s plan to respond to the pandemic as a “wartime undertaking.”Part of that plan involves asking Americans to wear masks for the first 100 days of his administration — a step that could save thousands of lives, he said — as it works to improve the vaccine rollout.”The masks have become a partisan issue, unfortunately,” Biden said, “but it’s a patriotic act.”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”The fact is they’re the single best thing we can do,” he said. “If we do this as Americans, the experts say by wearing a mask from now until April, we’d save more than 50,000 lives.”More than 408,000 Americans have died of COVID-19 as of Thursday afternoon, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. More than 62,000 deaths have been recorded this month, making January 2021 the second deadliest month of the pandemic, behind December 2020.Biden’s warning of tens of thousands more deaths in just a few weeks echoes the latest ensemble forecast by the CDC, which projects the death toll could reach up to 508,000 by Feb. 13.Biden’s remarks came on his first full day in office, which marked one year since the first patient with COVID-19 was identified in the U.S. That number has since ballooned to more than 24.5 million as of Thursday, according to Johns Hopkins.The president signed a series of executive orders to address the crisis on several fronts, including setting up a pandemic testing board.”Let me be clear: Things are going to get worse before they get better,” Biden said, adding that a memorial he held for COVID-19 victims this week will not be the last.”But let me be equally clear: We will get through this. We will defeat this pandemic,” he said.

COVID-19 vaccinations will not only help stop the virus from spreading, they will also hamper the coronavirus’ ability to mutate into new variants, Dr. Anthony Fauci said on Thursday.

“Viruses don’t mutate unless they replicate,” Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said at a news briefing at the White House, his first under the administration of President Joe Biden.

“And if you can suppress that by a very good vaccine campaign, then you could actually avoid this deleterious effect that you might get from the mutations,” Fauci said.

Fauci’s remarks come as scientists around the world attempt to decipher what the new variants may mean for those who’ve been vaccinated or have antibodies to the virus.

While a few recent studies suggest that a variant first detected in South Africa may be a problem, even for people who have been vaccinated, at least one recent study found evidence that people vaccinated against coronavirus will be protected against new variants.

The South African variant has not yet been detected in the United States. Other variants include one first identified in the United Kingdom and one found in Brazil.

Related video — Fauci: ‘Liberating’ to work with new team on virus

‘A constant pattern of basically running out’ of vaccine

For a second time, more than a million vaccine shots were given in a single day, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced on Thursday.

More than 17.5 million vaccine doses had been administered in the U.S., and almost 2.4 million Americans have been fully vaccinated, according to the CDC.

And the push to get people vaccinated has grown even as officials work to meet demand with limited supply.

“Demand for the vaccine will be much greater than the supply for some time,” Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds said in a Thursday news conference.

She said her state is 46th nationally in the amount of doses allocated, with just 19,500 doses each week, though the state is ranked 15th for administering the vaccine. She’s not sure why the state is receiving few doses but hopes that Iowa will be allocated more doses in the coming weeks, perhaps by the first week of February.

“We are doing a lot with relatively little vaccine,” Reynolds said.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said the state is administering about 65,000 doses a day — a rate that will deplete its current supply in two or three days. “What’s clear now is that we will be going from week to week and you will see a constant pattern of basically running out, waiting for the next week’s allocation and then starting up again,” Cuomo said.

The state will receive 250,400 doses next week, but Cuomo urged President Biden to increase the supply to states immediately.

“At this current rate of supply, it takes seven and a half months to get enough vaccine for the currently eligible population,” Cuomo said.

Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers issued a statewide mask mandate on Tuesday while the state waited for more vaccine doses.

“At the end of the day, vaccine supplies are limited, so while we continue to ask the federal government for more vaccines and faster, we have to keep working together to stop the spread today,” Evers said, “by continuing to wear our masks, staying home whenever we can, avoiding gatherings, and doubling down on our efforts to keep our friends, neighbors and families safe.”

Biden: US Death toll likely to top half a million in February

The COVID-19 death toll in the U.S. will likely top 500,000 next month, President Biden said in a news conference Thursday, as he portrayed his administration’s plan to respond to the pandemic as a “wartime undertaking.”

Part of that plan involves asking Americans to wear masks for the first 100 days of his administration — a step that could save thousands of lives, he said — as it works to improve the vaccine rollout.

“The masks have become a partisan issue, unfortunately,” Biden said, “but it’s a patriotic act.”

“The fact is they’re the single best thing we can do,” he said. “If we do this as Americans, the experts say by wearing a mask from now until April, we’d save more than 50,000 lives.”

More than 408,000 Americans have died of COVID-19 as of Thursday afternoon, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. More than 62,000 deaths have been recorded this month, making January 2021 the second deadliest month of the pandemic, behind December 2020.

Biden’s warning of tens of thousands more deaths in just a few weeks echoes the latest ensemble forecast by the CDC, which projects the death toll could reach up to 508,000 by Feb. 13.

Biden’s remarks came on his first full day in office, which marked one year since the first patient with COVID-19 was identified in the U.S. That number has since ballooned to more than 24.5 million as of Thursday, according to Johns Hopkins.

The president signed a series of executive orders to address the crisis on several fronts, including setting up a pandemic testing board.

“Let me be clear: Things are going to get worse before they get better,” Biden said, adding that a memorial he held for COVID-19 victims this week will not be the last.

“But let me be equally clear: We will get through this. We will defeat this pandemic,” he said.

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